Tagged: Hardware Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • Kartik 8:09 PM on April 19, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Hardware, ,   

    Found the culprit for a long standing problem with Linux install disk booting on my Dell Studio XPS 1645 today at http://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=46&t=126993#p692786 – it was my wireless card. Was facing this problem at least since last October when I tried to install latest editions of Fedora and ArchLinux but couldn’t. On Linux Mint 14 Cinnamon now.

    Advertisements
     
  • Kartik 9:25 PM on February 6, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: , , , Hardware, , , , , ,   

    Quickly Check Temperature Values of Hardware Components in Ubuntu 

    So, I missed posting yesterday. Hope this doesn’t repeat.

    Today I am sharing a small bash script I wrote to check the temperatures recorded by various sensors in my laptop. Nothing incredibly smart here, just a quick but useful hack.

    I am one of those unhappy Linux users who suffer from lack of driver support for their hardware. Due to some weird kernel bug or messy graphics driver, which led to incredibly high temperatures on my laptop,  I spent about a year using Linux as a VirtualBox guest in Windows; this was before Ubuntu 12.04 got shipped. During those times, my laptop used to shutdown automatically after reaching critical temperatures (100° C!) on simple tasks like watching a HD video on VLC.

    What all do we need? In *buntu systems, install sensors and hddtemp tools. I am using an ATi Radeon card and proprietary driver ships with a utility for reporting temperature for the same. You can modify the script to work with nVidia cards accordingly.

    sudo apt-get install lm-sensors hddtemp

    Next, you need to run sensors-detect to let sensors identify all the hardware monitoring sensors present in your system.

    sudo sensors-detect

    Press enter to accept default options when asked.

    Here is the script; hddtemp requires sudo making this script more than 3 lines:

    I have put this script in my local bin folder for quick access. To do the same, follow the steps:

    mkdir ~/bin

    Put this directory in your path by putting the following line at the end of your .bashrc file (replace k4rtik by your username)

    export PATH=$PATH:/home/k4rtik/bin

    mv temp.sh ~/bin/temp

    chmod +x temp

    Now either logout and login or issue the following command to be able to access the script by just entering temp on your terminal.

    source ~/.bashrc

    Here is a sample run from my machine:

    k4rtik: ~ $ temp
    acpitz-virtual-0
    Adapter: Virtual device
    temp1:        +26.8°C  (crit = +127.0°C)
    temp2:        +70.0°C  (crit = +85.0°C)
    
    coretemp-isa-0000
    Adapter: ISA adapter
    Core 0:       +70.0°C  (high = +84.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
    Core 1:       +70.0°C  (high = +84.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
    Core 2:       +70.0°C  (high = +84.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
    Core 3:       +70.0°C  (high = +84.0°C, crit = +100.0°C)
    
    Default Adapter - ATI Mobility Radeon HD 4670
                      Sensor 0: Temperature - 74.50 C
    
    Do you want to know hard disk temperature (requires sudo)? (y/N) y
    [sudo] password for k4rtik: 
    /dev/sda: ST9500420ASG: 51°C

    PS: Didn’t know earlier – embedding Github gists into WordPress is as easy as copy & pasting the URL. 🙂

     
  • Kartik 11:55 PM on February 2, 2013 Permalink
    Tags: 3D modeling, , Hardware, ,   

    My First and Last 3D SketchUp 

    So, here is the first one.

    This slideshow requires JavaScript.

    I had created this long back in Decemeber of 2006. The file cab.skp (Google SketchUp file) was lying in my system since ages. Tried opening it today, discovered there is no Linux support for its viewer/editor (you listening Google?). After some fiddling with Wine and finally resorting to spend some time on a friend’s Windows Laptop, here we are. Quite a piece of art, ain’t it? 😉

    Title: Zebronics GeForce Case 2

    Description: The glowing big-forehead alien cabinet of my PlatiniumV2.

    If somebody is interested, I found a review of the cabinet.

     
  • Kartik 10:12 PM on June 13, 2012 Permalink
    Tags: , , , , , Hardware, hardware hacker, , Open Hardware, , ,   

    (Bangalore) Summer of ’12… with BeagleBone 

    BeagleBone

    This post will be slightly long. Lots of exciting things happening over a Bangalore summer this year for me. 😀

    Somehow I always wanted to learn more about hardware and with a mentor like Khasim the road seems a lot more exciting. I first met him when he came to conduct a workshop on BeagleBoard during Tathva 2009 at my college – NIT Calicut. I was just a fresher then and have since regretted that I could not attend that workshop completely (due to my participation in various CS related competitions).

    Well, life took strange turns and I along with friend Jerrin landed up in Bangalore and got to hack together on a BeagleBone (a low-cost, high-expansion hardware-hacker focused BeagleBoard). We initially learnt the very basics of working with a board like this using the serial output on UART console (and discovered that we couldn’t proceed further until R219 was plucked out, thanks to another mentor Mr. Satish Patel from Khasim’s team; fiola on #beagle channel on freenode was a great help in troubleshooting as well), then there was Starterware which enabled us to experiment with blinking LEDs and other small programs for Bone.

    I then learnt how to read a schematic using the great book by Barr & Massa which Amarjit Singh suggested (now I will recommend this book, Programming Embedded Systems, as a TO-READ if you want to learn basics of embedded systems programming) and tried to understand the schematics of BeagleBone (rev. A4). I was able to identify how various components on the board connect to the processor and the direction of data flow among them and to understand how simple things like power reset, user LEDs, SDRAM, USB host & connector, microSD and expansion slots interact with the CPU.

    Exploration of the design specifications of the board with some details about each external peripheral present on the board from the BeagleBone System Reference Manual followed. I even tried to read ARM335x datasheet and Technical Reference Manual to extract useful information (like memory locations of on-chip peripherals, handling of interrupts at CPU level, etc.) – datasheets are HUGE documents! Using this data, referring the book by Barr & Massa and taking help from Starterware example programs I was able to write my (own) code from scratch for blinking an LED on BeagleBone as a pure learning exercise – believe me it was total fun (no matter however it may sound in this post)!

    Just today, I got my hands on Microchip’s Accessory Development Starter Kit for Android (pictured below). I will be using this to understand the ins and outs of Android’s Open Accessory Protocol and try to port the firmware on BeagleBone such that it could be used as an ADK platform as well. Lots of learning, fiddling with USB APIs, Android hacking, and of course embedded C programming to follow next (and I am up for the game!).

    Here are some pics of the awesome things I am playing with these days (click on image for larger view):

    I will try to regularly post about my progress here and yes, there is a lot more I have to say about this Bangalore Summer, but some other post, some other time. 🙂

    Ciao

    k4rtik

     
    • appu sajeev 10:30 PM on June 13, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      from where did u buy the beaglebone?

    • Sajjad Anwar (@geohacker) 12:16 AM on June 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Yay! Super excited to know that you are enjoying your time in Bangalore! Good luck 🙂

      • Kartik 12:45 AM on June 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Thanks. And it’s because of you and so many other people I am meeting here in Bangalore. 🙂

    • Pranav 9:50 AM on June 14, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Awesomeness 😀

    • Pramode 10:02 PM on June 15, 2012 Permalink | Reply

      Have fun hacking the BeagleBone (and other stuff)!!

      • Kartik 10:06 PM on June 15, 2012 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, loving it.
        And this time I would really love if you could visit our campus for a workshop on hardware hacking. We two would be able to assist too. 🙂

  • Kartik 12:00 AM on June 30, 2011 Permalink
    Tags: Bluetooth, , Data Communications, , , Hardware, , , , Smartphone, , , Wi-Fi, Wireless, Wireless LAN,   

    Use rfkill to Enable/Disable Wireless on your Linux Laptop 

    This notebook computer is connected to a wirel...

    This notebook computer is connected to a wireless access point using a PC card wireless card. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

    Imagine a situation when you have to book an air/train ticket in a jiffy, or check an important mail quickly and the only option you have is a wi-fi connection from either your smart phone or surroundings, and you have only some Linux variant installed on your system. And even after installing all the necessary drivers, you are unable to get the wi-fi on your laptop working? Frustrating right? If yes, then you might want to read on about this useful utility called rfkill which you can keep in handy for those weary situations.

    I own a Dell Studio XPS 1645 and have always found it cumbersome to get the wi-fi working on my system, mainly during those geek/hacker meetups, the only times I have to use wireless Internet. I remember randomly switching wireless on and off through the hardware switch and rebooting my system multiple times in order to get it working. Well, this was the situation until I discovered rfkill – a tool for enabling and disabling wireless devices including Wireless LAN, Bluetooth, etc. Here follows a tutorial on how to use it (fire up the Terminal before proceeding):

    rfkill’s list command lets you see all the available devices, if you don’t find any of your devices, make sure you have turned the hardware switch ON and have installed the drivers for each. Here is what I get on my system after enabling the hardware switch:

    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill list
    0: brcmwl-0: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: yes
    Hard blocked: no
    1: dell-wifi: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: yes
    Hard blocked: no
    2: dell-wwan: Wireless WAN
    Soft blocked: yes
    Hard blocked: yes
    3: hci0: Bluetooth
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $

    Apart from Bluetooth, I usually find all other devices to be in a random state of yes or no. To enable them, issue the unblock command as shown:

    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill unblock 0
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill unblock 1
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill unblock 2
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill list
    0: brcmwl-0: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: yes
    1: dell-wifi: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    2: dell-wwan: Wireless WAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    3: hci0: Bluetooth
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $

    You can also try using the unblock all command for enabling all the devices together:

    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill unblock all

    Sometimes it happens that even after unblocking once, some device(s) may show up as blocked (see the 0th device above, which shows hard blocked as yes). To correct this just issue the unblock command again for that particular device:

    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill unblock 0
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill list
    0: brcmwl-0: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    1: dell-wifi: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    2: dell-wwan: Wireless WAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    3: hci0: Bluetooth
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $

    When you get all the devices unblocked, you will not face any trouble connecting to wi-fi devices around. 🙂

    Bonus Tip: If you have a common hardware switch for wireless radios, you can turn off additional devices like Bluetooth (or vice versa) to save some battery life using the block command of rfkill:

    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill block 3
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $ rfkill list
    0: dell-wifi: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    1: dell-wwan: Wireless WAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    2: brcmwl-0: Wireless LAN
    Soft blocked: no
    Hard blocked: no
    3: hci0: Bluetooth
    Soft blocked: yes
    Hard blocked: no
    kartik@PlatiniumLight ~ $

    Stay Dignified!

    • Kartik

    Originally published at http://www.digimantra.com/linux/rfkill-enabledisable-wireless-linux-laptop/

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel